Il est tout de même consternant de voir des médecins et autres professionnels de santé se dresser contre une étude visant à vérifier l’innocuité et l’efficacité des vaccins, alors même que d’innombrables scandales sanitaires causés par l’industrie pharmacochimique, ont éclaté ces 30 dernières années ! Cet aveuglement et cette façon de faire comme si de rien n’était et que tout allait bien, relève de la psychiatrie. On imagine que ces dangers publics auraient réagi de la même façon si un budget avait été alloué pour vérifier l’innocuité du Mediator de Servier !


L’Ordre national des biologistes a fait un don de 10 000 € à un groupe qui s’interroge sur la sécurité des vaccins.

Some scientists in Italy are up in arms over a donation from the organization that oversees the nation’s professional biology qualification to an advocacy group that opposes the country’s policy of mandatory childhood vaccination.

The news comes as Italian politicians debate whether to continue with the mandatory vaccination policy, which was introduced in 2017 and requires parents to provide proof of ten routine vaccinations when enrolling their children in nurseries and preschools.

The group, Corvelva, announced that it had received €10,000 (US$11,350) from the Italian National Order of Biologists (ONB) on 26 October and says that it plans to use the money for research that investigates the safety and efficacy of commonly used vaccines.

Corvelva says that the research it proposes is necessary because previous studies it has funded, which have not yet been published in a peer-reviewed journal, indicate that some vaccines contain impurities, or lack the active ingredients they claim to contain.

ONB president Vincenzo D’Anna told Nature in an e-mail interview that there is a need for truly independent vaccine research because, in his opinion, work conducted in public laboratories and at universities is usually influenced or funded by companies that produce vaccines.

“The goal is to contribute to complete the biological and chemical analyses on vaccines,” he said in the interview, part of which the ONB has published in its Bulletin.

Rigorous testing

But many scientists dismiss the need for the additional research — on the grounds that vaccines are already rigorously tested — and are flummoxed by the ONB’s decision to donate to Corvelva. “My first reaction was bewilderment,” says geneticist Gerolamo Lanfranchi of the University of Padova.

Membership in the ONB confers certification for positions in the biological sciences in Italy — such as roles in nutrition, public health or environmental services. The ONB collaborates with university biology departments, including the University of Padova, to organize qualifying examinations for membership. The order has about 50,000 members who each pay an annual membership fee of €120.

“There’s solid evidence that vaccines work and are safe,” says virologist Giorgio Palù at the University of Padova, who is president of the European and Italian societies for virology.

The large-scale, expensive studies that test vaccines’ efficacy and monitor for adverse side effects are regulated and supervised by national and international health agencies and are “far more accurate than tests that could be done with €10,000”, says Gennaro Ciliberto, a molecular biologist at the University of Catanzaro Magna Graecia and president of the Italian Federation for the Life Sciences, which includes 14 scientific societies.

Once vaccines are approved, these agencies continue to monitor them by testing batches and production facilities for safety, as well as tracking adverse reactions, he adds.

But Marchi says that studies that monitor adverse reactions don’t track participants for long enough after they have been vaccinated, and so “cannot exclude the possibility that vaccines are toxic”. D’Anna emphasized that the donation to Corvelva is not the full amount that will be spent on the research. “Ours was a contribution among many,” he said.

Some scientists in Italy are up in arms over a donation from the organization that oversees the nation’s professional biology qualification to an advocacy group that opposes the country’s policy of mandatory childhood vaccination.

The news comes as Italian politicians debate whether to continue with the mandatory vaccination policy, which was introduced in 2017 and requires parents to provide proof of ten routine vaccinations when enrolling their children in nurseries and preschools.

The group, Corvelva, announced that it had received €10,000 (US$11,350) from the Italian National Order of Biologists (ONB) on 26 October and says that it plans to use the money for research that investigates the safety and efficacy of commonly used vaccines.

Corvelva says that the research it proposes is necessary because previous studies it has funded, which have not yet been published in a peer-reviewed journal, indicate that some vaccines contain impurities, or lack the active ingredients they claim to contain.

ONB president Vincenzo D’Anna told Nature in an e-mail interview that there is a need for truly independent vaccine research because, in his opinion, work conducted in public laboratories and at universities is usually influenced or funded by companies that produce vaccines.

“The goal is to contribute to complete the biological and chemical analyses on vaccines,” he said in the interview, part of which the ONB has published in its Bulletin.

Rigorous testing

But many scientists dismiss the need for the additional research — on the grounds that vaccines are already rigorously tested — and are flummoxed by the ONB’s decision to donate to Corvelva. “My first reaction was bewilderment,” says geneticist Gerolamo Lanfranchi of the University of Padova.

Membership in the ONB confers certification for positions in the biological sciences in Italy — such as roles in nutrition, public health or environmental services. The ONB collaborates with university biology departments, including the University of Padova, to organize qualifying examinations for membership. The order has about 50,000 members who each pay an annual membership fee of €120.

“There’s solid evidence that vaccines work and are safe,” says virologist Giorgio Palù at the University of Padova, who is president of the European and Italian societies for virology.

The large-scale, expensive studies that test vaccines’ efficacy and monitor for adverse side effects are regulated and supervised by national and international health agencies and are “far more accurate than tests that could be done with €10,000”, says Gennaro Ciliberto, a molecular biologist at the University of Catanzaro Magna Graecia and president of the Italian Federation for the Life Sciences, which includes 14 scientific societies.

Once vaccines are approved, these agencies continue to monitor them by testing batches and production facilities for safety, as well as tracking adverse reactions, he adds.

But Marchi says that studies that monitor adverse reactions don’t track participants for long enough after they have been vaccinated, and so “cannot exclude the possibility that vaccines are toxic”. D’Anna emphasized that the donation to Corvelva is not the full amount that will be spent on the research. “Ours was a contribution among many,” he said…